ARCHIVE

ARTISTS

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VIETNAMESE UNDERGROUND METAL

BLOODY CHUNKS

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ARCHIVE

YOUTH & SUB-CULTURES

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LOCKDOWN 2020/21

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THE VIETNAM COLLECTION

UNTITLED

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TESTIMONIAL

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ART ::: KALEID{}ESCAPES ::: 2020/21

Since late 2020 in the middle of the UK lockdown I started to create these new worlds ::: 'KALEID{}ESCAPES' :::

::: NEON DUST ::: was created during the last snow fall in the UK in February 2021. These kaleidoscopic artworks mirror the symmetrical shapes of a snowflake. They were made from Neon Dust, Black Light and Snow which acted as the canvas.

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ARCHIVE * 1988/2019

AN ODE TO: THE BRITISH TELEPHONE BOX (2017-2019)

On the streets of London, 'The British Telephone Box' stands battered and beaten; a disused relic from our recent history, still used by a small minority but mainly forgotten. Photographed on the technology that replaced - mobile phones. 'An Ode to: The British Telephone Box' documents the last ones standing. This is my visual poem.

THE VIETNAM COLLECTION (2009-2015)

In 2009 I moved to Vietnam where I lived for the next 6 years. I fell in love with Vietnamese culture and its people - Vietnam, a communist country embracing capitalism and undergoing rapid economic and cultural development. This provided the backdrop to a series of long-term photographic projects ('Bloody Chunks', 'Untitled', 'Song' and 'Monobloc') entitled 'The Vietnam Collection'.  This body of work explores Vietnamese life - in all its raw unadulterated beauty.

BLOODY CHUNKS | THE VIETNAMESE UNDERGROUND METAL SCENE

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MUSICIANS + YOUTH CULTURE (1988-Present)

Limited Edition Art Prints of Musicians / Artists from my photographic archive.

This body of work was taken between 1999-2005. During this time, I was an editorial photographer working for style and music magazines - The Face, Sleazenation and Q, here in London. 

Looking back, I guess we were lucky; magazines were paying photographers a day rate and covered our film processing costs to travel the world to shoot artists and youth culture. The digital camera was in development, but we were all still shooting film. The internet was in its early stages so there wasn’t much research happening. As photographers, it was an exciting time to be sent abroad and document a far away youth scene or artist and be expected to come back with the goods.

I’ve always been interested in the importance of documentary photography, and, with the passing of time, how powerful photography becomes in a historical context.

PHARRELL WILLIAMS (2002)

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